This Teacher’s Post About A Simple Gift From A Student Is Going Viral

It’s only one day after Christmas and, already, heartwarming stories about thoughtful holiday gifts are already pouring in. Like this one out of Kennewick, Washington.

Just before Christmas break, Amistad Elementary teacher Rachel Uretsky-Pratt took to Facebook to share a photo of a gift one her students had given her. It was a tiny plastic bag of Lucky Charms marshmallows:

As someone who has at one point in her life ordered a 1-pound bag of Lucky Charms Marshmallows for herself through Amazon, it doesn’t take much for me to acknowledge the awesomeness of this gift. But Uretsky-Pratt went on to explain why this particular bag of marshmallows was extra special.

“With it being the day before break and Christmas right around the corner,” she wrote, “most teachers bring their kiddos something such as books or little treats and occasionally in return receive something from their students. Today I received some chocolates, sweet handmade notes, some jewelry, but these Lucky Charm marshmallows stood out to me the most. You see, 100% of my school is on free/reduced lunch. They also get free breakfast at school every day of the school week. This kiddo wanted to get my [sic] something so badly, but had nothing to give. So rather than give me nothing, this student opened up her free breakfast cereal this morning, took the packaging of her spork, straw, and napkin, and finally took the time to take every marshmallow out of her cereal to put in a bag—for me.”

If I could get away with it, I would make this entire post a sobbing emoji. And apparently, I’m not the only one who had a strong, emotional reaction to Uretsky-Pratt’s post. As of this writing, her post has been shared over 125,000 times, has racked up over 21,000 comments, and has been liked more than 372 thousand times.

Not only that, but Uretsky-Pratt has received numerous offers of gifts and other donations for her, her students, her classroom and her school. In an update to her post, she explained that she was not allowed to accept gifts as a public employee of the state and district, but she did share the contact information for Amistad’s principal.

“Truly I have learned as much from my students about life as they have learned about math, science, reading, and writing from me,” she wrote in her update. “Learning in my classroom will always be a two way street. My wish for all of you is to remember this kind and simple gesture of love from one of my school babies and carry it with you and continue to spread love and kindness to everyone you meet-not just during this holiday season.”